Anticipatory responsible innovation

Futures construction in the face of the techno-economic imperative

  • Hannot Rodríguez University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0769-4634
  • Sergio Urueña University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Education, Philosophy and Anthropology), Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1084-2709
  • Andoni Ibarra Full Professor; University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Education, Philosophy and Anthropology), Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0700
Keywords: Anticipation, Responsible Innovation, RRI, Open Science, Anticipatory Ambivalence, Socio-Technical Futures

Abstract

The call for the development of more responsible research and innovation has increasingly permeated European Union research and development policies. Specifically, under the auspices of approaches such as “Responsible Research and Innovation” (RRI) and “Open Science”, these policies conceive of the need to make innovation dynamics radically open and debatable, even with regard to the underlying preferences and expectations shaping them. Responsibility has thus been conceived in eminently anticipatory terms, that is, in terms of collectively taking care in the present of the futures enabled through innovation practices. This normative conception, which emphasises the politicisation of the ways futures are constructed through innovation and goals they are oriented towards, is nonetheless realised within a context where the prevailing way of approaching the future with regard to innovation systems is highly committed to a capitalist imperative of technological progress and economic growth. This article argues that while anticipation – understood as an interventive practice – can deploy valuable responsibilisation heuristics, their degree of disruptiveness, or openness, may depend on how such interventive practice engaging with futures deals with this techno-economic commitment, or imperative.

Author Biographies

Hannot Rodríguez, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain

Associate Professor, Member of the Miguel Sánchez-Mazas Chair and the PRAXIS Research Group (University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU). His research focuses on risk governance of emerging technologies, responsible innovation, and philosophical and social dimensions of science and technology. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0769-4634

Sergio Urueña, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Education, Philosophy and Anthropology), Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain

Predoctoral Research Fellow, Member of the Miguel Sánchez-Mazas Chair and the PRAXIS Research Group (University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU). His research focuses on the epistemology and methodology of anticipation as an interventive resource to promote more sociopolitically robust governance dynamics in science, technology, and innovation. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1084-2709

Andoni Ibarra, Full Professor; University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Education, Philosophy and Anthropology), Donostia-San Sebastián, Spain

Head of the Miguel Sánchez-Mazas Chair at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU. He is also Senior Research Fellow at the KHK “Cultures of Research”, RWTH Aachen University. His main areas of expertise are modeling in science, the performative character of scientific representations, RRI, public engagement and anticipatory governance. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0700

Published
2022-02-28